supreme court

Gordon Hirabayashi, Historic Resister of US' arbitrary and indefinite detention dies

[Only a few days after President Obama signed into law provisions for arbitary and capricious seizure and indefinite detention of US citizens--throwing out habeus corpus and other "Constitutional rights"--one of the most prominent and courageous opponents of such a repressive policy--the US' detention of Japanese American citizens during World War II--has died.  --Frontlines ed.]

———————————-

My Guantánamo Nightmare, by Lakhdar Boumediene

My Guantánamo Nightmare   by LAKHDAR BOUMEDIENE   Jan 7, 2012

On Wednesday, America’s detention camp at Guantánamo Bay will have been open for 10 years. For seven of them, I was held there without explanation or charge. During that time my daughters grew up without me. They were toddlers when I was imprisoned, and were never allowed to visit or speak to me by phone. Most of their letters were returned as “undeliverable,” and the few that I received were so thoroughly and thoughtlessly censored that their messages of love and support were lost.

Some American politicians say that people at Guantánamo are terrorists, but I have never been a terrorist. Had I been brought before a court when I was seized, my children’s lives would not have been torn apart, and my family would not have been thrown into poverty. It was only after the United States Supreme Court ordered the government to defend its actions before a federal judge that I was finally able to clear my name and be with them again.

Justice In Dreamland

Police officers following a suspect into an apartment complex in Lexington, Ky., don’t know which apartment their man has entered. But wafting through one of the closed apartment doors is the familiar odor of marijuana. The smell provides reason to believe criminal activity is afoot, probable cause for a warrant to search the apartment.

Supreme Court Says, "Get Used To Living In A Police State"

Supreme Court gives police a new entryway into homes

The Supreme Court, in an 8-1 decision in a Kentucky case, says police officers who loudly knock on a door in search of illegal drugs and then hear sounds suggesting evidence is being destroyed may break down the door and enter without a search warrant.

      Help Save Troy Davis (Spread this VIDEO)

      Spread the Word by Sharing This Video

      Over the last week, more than 30,000 members of the NAACP family have spoken up and stood by Troy Davis. Now it's up to us to spread the word so that our collective voice can be even louder. 

      Protests Grow in Solidarity With California Prisoners As Hunger Strikes Enter Third Week, Democracy Now! July 15, 2011

      INTERVIEWS BELOW

      Thousands of inmates in at least 13 prisons across California’s troubled prison system have been on hunger strike for almost two weeks. Many are protesting in solidarity with inmates held in Pelican Bay State Prison, California’s first super-maximum security prison, over what prisoners say are cruel and unusual conditions in "Secure Housing Units." We play an audio statement from one of the Pelican Bay prisoners and speak to three guests: Dorsey Nunn, co-founder of "All of Us or None" and executive director of Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, and one of the mediators between the prisoners on hunger strike and the California Department of Corrections; Molly Porzig, a member of the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity coalition and a spokesperson for Critical Resistance; and Desiree Lozoya, the niece of an inmate participating in the Pelican Bay Hunger Strike, who visited him last weekend.

      Molly Porzig, a member of the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity coalition and a spokesperson for Critical Resistance.
      Dorsey Nunn, co-founder of "All of Us or None." He is also the executive director of Legal Services for Prisoners with Children. Nunn was incarcerated from 1971 to 1982 in San Quentin Prison in California. He is one of the mediators between the prisoners on hunger strike and the California Department of Corrections.
      Desiree Lozoya, is the niece of an inmate participating in the Pelican Bay hunger strike.

      JUAN GONZALEZ: We turn now to California, where thousands of inmates in at least 11 prisons across the state’s troubled prison system have been on hunger strike for almost two weeks. Many are protesting in solidarity with inmates held in Pelican Bay State Prison, California’s first super-maximum security prison.

      The hunger strike began on July 1st in the Pelican Bay’s Security Housing Unit, when inmates began refusing meals to protest what they say is cruel and unusual conditions. Prisoners in the units are kept in total isolation for 22-and-a-half hours a day, a punishment some mental health experts say can lead to insanity and is tantamount to torture.

      Democracy Now! obtained a recording of an audio statement that one of the Pelican Bay inmates, Ted Ashker sic, made to his legal team in the secure prison’s Secure Housing Unit, which is referred to as the SHU. You will need to listen closely as he explains his reasons for joining the hunger strike.

      TODD ASHKER: The basis for this protest has come about after over 25 years—some of us, 30, some up to 40 years—of being subjected to these conditions the last 21 years in Pelican Bay SHU, where every single day you have staff and administrators who feel it’s their job to punish the worst of the worst, as they’ve put out propaganda for the last 21 years that we are the worst of the worst. And most of us have never been found guilty of ever committing an illegal gang-related act. But we’re in SHU because of a label. And all of our 602 appeals, numerous court challenges, have gotten nowhere. Therefore, our backs are up against the wall.

      Will Cops Be Required to Tell You Explicitly That You Have a Right To Have A Lawyer Present During Any Questioning?

      This is an older article, and the court did not decide to make the cops tell you more when they are drilling you.  No matter what the courts change or don't , always assert "I choose to remain silent and I want to see a lawyer."  Then, say nothing else. Cops don't have to give a Miranda warning, anyway, until you're arrested and they want to further question you.  Know Your Rights!

      Miranda rights warning could get rewrite

      Supreme Court weighs whether to make some parts more explicit

      Supreme Court Miranda Ruling: Suspects Must Explicitly Tell Police They Want To Remain Silent

      The case is Berghuis v. Thompkins, 08-1470.   CLICK HERE for the Supreme Court Ruling

      Want to invoke your right to remain silent? You'll have to speak up.

      In a narrowly split decision, the Supreme Court's conservative majority expanded its limits on the famous Miranda rights for criminal suspects on Tuesday – over the dissent of new Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who said the ruling turned Americans' rights of protection from police abuse "upside down."

      Mobilize and Fight To Save Mumia's Life!

      People in the Humboldt area and wherever you are!  Please mobilize rallies, media, strikes, shut downs, walk outs, etc to save Mumia Abu Jamal.  If you've never spread the word before, spread it NOW!!  Pass this email on to all of your lists.  AT LEAST SIGN THE PETITIONS!!  Listen to Mumia's radio commentaries from Death Row, and fight for his life!!  There are many links at the bottom of this message.

      And put MUMIA messages on your MYSPACE, FACEBOOK, etc!!

       

      Important Supreme Court Ruling for Undocumented Workers

      Supreme Court Limits Identity Theft Law

      The Supreme Court has ruled undocumented workers using false papers cannot be charged with aggravated identity theft unless they knew their fake IDs belonged to a real person. The Bush administration frequently charged undocumented immigrants with felony identity theft, which carries a two-year sentence. Prosecutors had used the threat of a felony to persuade undocumented workers to plead guilty to lesser charges of document fraud.