probation

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS & HOW TO EXERCISE THEM (pg4 Days of Action 2012 booklet)

 

Stand up for your rights.      We are all leaders.    Stay present.

We are here as community to be aware of each other and take care of one another.

The system that criminalizes one of us has the potential to criminalize us all.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS & HOW TO EXERCISE THEM

Each of us has the right to free speech, to travel and to assemble (1st Amendment to the Constitution). Nevertheless, the police or Sheriff may give people a hard time. Do not ask cops for legal advice. Officers are allowed to LIE, and they do. Even if you are on parole or probation, you never have to speak to a cop.

You never have to speak to or answer an officer, so don't!
It is always a better idea to continue chanting with everyone else.

If a cop approaches, ask “Am I free to go?” If they don't tell you that you must stay or that you're detained, calmly walk away. Even if you are being detained, do not answer questions.

If an officer questions, threatens, detains, or arrests you at any time, you can say the magic words: I choose to remain silent. I want to see a lawyer.” Then remain silent. These words and the refusal to talk to any law officer is protected by the 5th Amendment. Officers are not supposed to ask you questions once you have said you want to see a lawyer.* They will often try to intimidate you into talking. The safest words are the magic words.

Remaining silent. If you do speak to the officers, follow it up with the magic words and nothing else. *After you have said you want to see a lawyer, officers are only permitted to ask your name and address. You can continue to remain silent. If an officer tries to search you or your property, clearly say “I do not consent to a search.” Stay calm, even if the cop searches anyway. Say the magic words.

The magic words protect you from police questions & conversation. Police are trained to get you to talk and give up your rights.

You are not required to “keep moving”; only to make sure people can get by (that you’re not blocking their passage)


If ARRESTED, say the Magic Words:

 
I choose to remain silent. I want to see a lawyer.”

Medical Marijuana Patients on Probation or Parole

 

February 2009:
Medical Marijuana Patients on Probation or Parole

As a California medical cannabis patient, in order to be able to medicate while on probation, you should present a copy of your recommendation and print out a copy of People v. Tilehkooh for your probation officer to include in your file.

 

You can explain to your Probation Officer that this case states that medical marijuana patients who were not convicted of marijuana related charges should be permitted to possess, transport, and cultivate their medicine while on probation. If possible, try to create a written agreement with your Probation Officer.

U.S.A. Locking Up Poor People In Unprecedented Numbers

New research shows precisely how the prison-to-poverty cycle does its damage.

Forty years after the United States began its experimentation with mass incarceration policies, the country is increasingly divided economically. In new research published in the review Daedalus, a group of leading criminologists coordinated by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (which paid me to consult on this project) argued that much of that growing inequality, which Slate's Timothy Noah has chronicled, is linked to the increasingly widespread use of prisons and jails.

It's well-known that the United States imprisons drastically more people than other Western countries. Here are the specifics: We now imprison more people in absolute numbers and per capita than any other country on earth. With 5 percent of the world population, the U.S. hosts upward of 20 percent of its prisoners.

This is because the country's incarceration rate has roughly quintupled since the early 1970s. About 2 million Americans currently live behind bars in jails, state prisons, and federal penitentiaries, and many millions more are on parole or probation or have been in the recent past. In 2008, as a part of an "American Exception" series exploring the U.S. criminal-justice system, New York Times reporter Adam Liptak pointed out that overseas criminologists were "mystified and appalled" by the scale of American incarceration. States like California now spend more on locking people up than on funding higher education.

Too Many Laws, Too Many Prisoners

[article in The Economist!]

Never in the civilised world have so many been locked up for so little

Jul 22nd 2010 | Spring, Texas


THREE pickup trucks pulled up outside George Norris’s home in Spring, Texas. Six armed police in flak jackets jumped out. Thinking they must have come to the wrong place, Mr Norris opened his front door, and was startled to be shoved against a wall and frisked for weapons. He was forced into a chair for four hours while officers ransacked his house. They pulled out drawers, rifled through papers, dumped things on the floor and eventually loaded 37 boxes of Mr Norris’s possessions onto their pickups. They refused to tell him what he had done wrong. “It wasn’t fun, I can tell you that,” he recalls.

 

U.S. judges admit to jailing children for money

The really amazing thing is that they got caught.

- Tom Lacey, SF Peace and Freedom

 

U.S. judges admit to jailing children for money

Thu Feb 12, 2009, By Jon Hurdle, PHILADELPHIA (Reuters)

 

Two judges pleaded guilty on Thursday to accepting more than $2.6 million from a private youth detention center in Pennsylvania in return for giving hundreds of youths and teenagers long sentences.