unemployment

Sat 12/17: Occupy Eureka Celebrates OWS 3 Month Birthday with New Free Speech Kiosk

Occupy Eureka invites you to the Humboldt County Courthouse to attend our unveiling of our new information kiosk as we call out for justice and equality for the 99% through the exercise of our first amendment rights. This event is part of a movement-wide call to "re-occupy" in the wake of coordinated attacks and subsequent evictions of occupations across the nation and around the world.

UPRISING! Why People Are Rioting In Britain (August 13, 2011)

This article should be read after: Rage at the police hits the streets of north London

Police Brutality and Tory Attacks Caused the Riots

The riots that swept large parts of London, Birmingham, Liverpool and Bristol last night are an explosion of bitterness and rage.

This is what happens in a society of deep and growing inequality, where there are great pools of unemployment and poverty, where there is systematic police harassment and racism, and where many young people feel they have no future.

Just as with the student protests last year, it is the “lost generation” created by the Tories who are at the centre of these struggles—although many older people were also involved.

U.S.A. Locking Up Poor People In Unprecedented Numbers

New research shows precisely how the prison-to-poverty cycle does its damage.

Forty years after the United States began its experimentation with mass incarceration policies, the country is increasingly divided economically. In new research published in the review Daedalus, a group of leading criminologists coordinated by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (which paid me to consult on this project) argued that much of that growing inequality, which Slate's Timothy Noah has chronicled, is linked to the increasingly widespread use of prisons and jails.

It's well-known that the United States imprisons drastically more people than other Western countries. Here are the specifics: We now imprison more people in absolute numbers and per capita than any other country on earth. With 5 percent of the world population, the U.S. hosts upward of 20 percent of its prisoners.

This is because the country's incarceration rate has roughly quintupled since the early 1970s. About 2 million Americans currently live behind bars in jails, state prisons, and federal penitentiaries, and many millions more are on parole or probation or have been in the recent past. In 2008, as a part of an "American Exception" series exploring the U.S. criminal-justice system, New York Times reporter Adam Liptak pointed out that overseas criminologists were "mystified and appalled" by the scale of American incarceration. States like California now spend more on locking people up than on funding higher education.