mass incarceration

October 22-23, Days of Action Against Police Brutality *Updated with Schedule for 2013!*

Bring warm clothes and any other warm stuff for folks who need it.  Local call to action is below schedule.

Tuesday, Oct 22  18th NATIONAL DAY OF PROTEST


1:00pm Cesar Chavez Park (formerly 'Hammond Park' 14 & E, Eureka)
              CONVERGE AND PREPARE FOR MARCH - with lunch

2:30pm starting from Cesar Chavez Park (14th & E, Eureka)
               MARCH OF RESISTANCE TO POLICE BRUTALITY

6:00pm Carson Park (Carson & H, Eureka -on the Carson end)
              MUSIC FOR THE PEOPLE- Live Concert, Dinner, Speak Out!

 

CANDLELIGHT WALK Honor The Victims And Survivors Of State Violence

10:00pm Cesar Chavez Park (14th & E, Eureka)
                ALL NIGHT VIGIL To Protest the Criminalization of Sleep, with FILM SCREENING

 

Wednesday, Oct 23  MEMORIAL DAY FOR CHRISTOPHER BURGESS


midnite-3:00am
Humboldt Courthouse/Jail
“WELCOME OUT!” Support People Released From Jail At Cold, Unfriendly Hours. 
Help distribute warm clothes, warm beverage, and a welcoming smile!

 

9:00am Clarke Plaza (3rd & E St., Eureka)
              BREAKFAST


11:00am
starting from Clarke Plaza (3rd & E St., Eureka)

                MARCH through neighborhoods & to police stations.
               
March for Chris Burgess, murdered by Eureka Police Officer Oct 23, 2006.

4:00-7:00pm corner of Wabash & Broadway, Eureka
              PROTEST & DINNER Stop the criminalization of youth!
                  Being young is NOT A  CRIME! Stop the school-to-prison pipeline!

 

Call 707.633.4493 for more details or check out redwoodcurtaincopwatch.net.

Days of Action Against Police Brutality   Oct 22-23

See you there.

Vote YES on Prop 36: Amend the Three Strikes Law

America's prison problem (Great VIDEO)

Why does the US put so many people behind bars and what lies behind California's new push for leniency?

last Modified: 01 Nov 2012 14:40

By filmmakers Michael Montgomery and Monica Lam

The US locks up more people than any other country in the world, spending over $80billion each year to keep some two million prisoners behind bars. Over the past three decades, tough sentencing laws have contributed to a doubling of the country's prison population, with laws commonly known as 'three strikes and you're out' mandating life sentences for a wide range of crimes.

But a clear sign that Americans are rethinking crime and punishment is a voter's initiative on California's November ballot called Proposition 36 that seeks to reform the state's three-strikes law. Some 27 states have three-strikes laws patterned after California's version, which was one of the first to be enacted in the country.

Since it was passed in 1994, nearly 9,000 felons have been convicted in California under the law.

One of them is Norman Williams, a 49-year-old African-American man who was a crack addict living on the streets. He was convicted of burglarising an empty home and later stealing an armload of tools from an art studio. His third strike: filching a jack from a tow truck in Long Beach. His fate sealed under California's three-strikes law, Williams was sent to a maximum security prison [for a life sentence] alongside murderers, rapists and other violent criminals.

"I never wanted to do my whole life in prison. Nobody wants to be caged like that," Williams says.

Williams was lucky. After 13 years behind bars, his case was reviewed by a judge and he was released. He is one of about two dozen 'three strikers' who have won sentence reductions through the work of a Stanford University law clinic founded by Michael Romano. In Williams' case, the prosecutor actually agreed that the original sentence was too harsh. An idea emerged from Romano's work: Why not draft a ballot initiative to ensure that sentences like Williams' will not be repeated?

"When people originally passed the three-strikes law in 1994 the campaigns were about keeping serious and violent murderers, child molesters in prison for the rest of their lives," Romano says. "I think that's what people want and are kind of shocked to hear that people have been sentenced to life for petty theft."

Youth Justice Coalition Oct. 10, 2012 STATEMENT TO THE STREETS & ALL YOUTH LOCK-UPS

Statement to the Streets and All Youth Lock-ups

Last summer, people held in the SHU - Security Housing Unit - at Pelican Bay State Prison declared a hunger strike to protest the cruel and inhumane conditions inside. The hunger strikespread to more than 7,000 people locked up in California prisons. People from all "sides" - blacks,whites, Asians, Surenos and Nortenos put all politics behind and came together to demand their human rights.

On this day, October 10, 2012, the men in the Security Housing Unit at Pelican Bay are againleading all of us. They have called for "an end to all hostilities" within our state's prisons and jails. After doing so much time, the men in the Pelican Bay SHU have realized that they are being recycled over and over through the same dead-end system. For all of us, there must be a cut off point - a time at which we stop participating in our own destruction.

As young people who have experienced bloodshed on the streets of Los Angeles, and the violence and humiliation within juvenile halls, Probation camps and Division of Juvenile Justice Youth Prisons, we are also calling for an end to the war between the youth.

Movement-Building: Petition & Statement of Solidarity with Georgia Prisoner Strike

Fellow human rights defenders,

Thank you to all those who have followed the inspiring lead of the Georgia prisoners responsible for the largest strike in U.S. history. Please visit this link (http://www.petitiononline.com/wagesnow/petition.html) to view the current
signers of the Solidarity Statement, which is in essence a petition to the
people of this country to take concrete actions to build this movement.

So many people have been committed to this for years already, and because of the bold and dignified stand taken in Georgia we have an opportunity build
on these efforts.

MOTHERS DAY, May 13th: Mothers Smashing the Prison Industrial Complex & Mothers Speaking Out for Their Children in Solitary Confinement (Hear Audio)

Mother’s Day provides an opportunity to honor and celebrate our given and chosen families.  For those of us fighting the prison industrial complex, Mother’s Day can also provide an opportunity to reflect on the ways the Prison Industrial Complex (PIC) attacks and disrupts our families. 

The good news is that all over the world moms are leading the charge against the PIC.

Tues, March 6th: Rallying Against the World's Largest Jail System, LA County

The threat of jail expansion comes amidst numerous lawsuits surrounding allegations of systematic abuse and torture in LA’s jails as well as numerous reports and expert opinions recommending against the rampant misuse of incarceration in the county. ...  Twenty counties in California have applied for a total of  $1,102,855,803 including a $100 million application from LA County. ...

HEARING ON RACISM AND POLICE VIOLENCE Oakland • February 19-20, 2011

Join us for a HEARING ON RACISM AND POLICE VIOLENCE
Oakland • February 2011

Come share Testimony and Demand Accountability on the Issues of Racist Law Enforcement and Police Suppression of Civil Liberties. Testimony will include witnesses to police killings across the country and experts on the impact of racial profiling and mass incarcerations.

THE HEARING (originally planned for January) HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED FOR SATURDAY & SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19TH & 20TH 

Oakland High (1023 MacArthur near Park Blvd) Oakland, CA

 

SPONSORED BY:

• Mieklejohn Civil Liberties Institute
• Malcolm X Grassroots Movement
• New Years Movement
• East Side Arts Alliance
• Onyx• Collision Course Video
• African People’s Socialist Party
• National Lawyers Guild
• Hard Knock Radio
• US Human Rights Network

 

U.S.A. Locking Up Poor People In Unprecedented Numbers

New research shows precisely how the prison-to-poverty cycle does its damage.

Forty years after the United States began its experimentation with mass incarceration policies, the country is increasingly divided economically. In new research published in the review Daedalus, a group of leading criminologists coordinated by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (which paid me to consult on this project) argued that much of that growing inequality, which Slate's Timothy Noah has chronicled, is linked to the increasingly widespread use of prisons and jails.

It's well-known that the United States imprisons drastically more people than other Western countries. Here are the specifics: We now imprison more people in absolute numbers and per capita than any other country on earth. With 5 percent of the world population, the U.S. hosts upward of 20 percent of its prisoners.

This is because the country's incarceration rate has roughly quintupled since the early 1970s. About 2 million Americans currently live behind bars in jails, state prisons, and federal penitentiaries, and many millions more are on parole or probation or have been in the recent past. In 2008, as a part of an "American Exception" series exploring the U.S. criminal-justice system, New York Times reporter Adam Liptak pointed out that overseas criminologists were "mystified and appalled" by the scale of American incarceration. States like California now spend more on locking people up than on funding higher education.