police burtality

August 9th is COTTON DAY; Remembering Martin Cotton & Resisting Police Violence

Martin F. Cotton II was BEAT TO DEATH by Eureka Police and Humboldt Sheriff's on August 9th, 2007. 

Please join us Tuesday August 9th, 2011 in Remembrance of Martin Cotton and in Resistance to the injustice system that took his life.

Martin Cotton won't be forgotten!  Stop Police Brutality

---1:00pm RALLY in front of the Courthouse in Eureka

and Walk to the Boardwalk for peaceful REMEMBRANCE of Martin

We have plenty of signs, some from past demonstrations and a bunch from folks in the Bay area- sent in support of Justice for Martin Cotton


Then, later on...

---6:00pm  "Tell It Like It Is!” Open Mic: Survival Stories about Police Violence

at Synapsis 47 W 3rd Street, Eureka

light dinner and refreshments

music, poetry, spoken word, any way you want to express your experience, or just be there!

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO HELP OUT ON COTTON DAY or organize in the near future for public presence at the civil rights trial set to begin in September against the City of Eureka and County of Humboldt, , please contact us.  707.633.4493  copwatchrwc@riseup.net

Click the link below to hear a song for Martin Cotton by Two Smooth Stones. 

Cotton Day Song

"It is a subterranean fire. You cannot put it out."

May Day turns 125 years old this year. Elizabeth Schulte tells the story of the fight for the eight-hour day--and of the Haymarket Martyrs who gave their lives for it.

The Haymarket Martyrs

ON MAY 1, 1886--125 years ago this month--hundreds of thousands of workers were taking the streets of cities around the U.S. to demand an eight-hour day.

The epicenter of this great labor struggle was Chicago, where the eight-hour movement inspired defiant protests and strikes--and inspired fear and repression from bosses and their loyal servants in law enforcement.

Two days after the massive May 1 actions, Chicago police fired on a protest of workers at a South Side factory, killing four people. A protest demonstration was called the next day for Haymarket, just west of downtown. The rally was peaceful, but as it was nearing a close, police waded into the crowd. At this point, a bomb was thrown into the ranks of police--and this became the excuse for a deadly rampage by the authorities.

Eight working-class radicals were arrested and charged with conspiring to commit the bombing--even though most weren't even at Haymarket when the explosion occurred.

The eight radicals were prosecuted--but it was the entire eight-hour movement that was put on trial.

The robber barons wanted to destroy the workers' movement. And they had good reason. The struggle of workers--and their demand for the eight-hour day--threatened the very foundations of the employers' profits.